If you are in immediate danger call 911!

Reach out with any questions you have

If you are not in immediate danger and need help and someone to talk to, or are inquiring about our programs and services please call us at 780-875-0966 or text 780-808-1777.

Crisis Hotline

780-875-0966

Text

780-808-1777

Contact email

SAFETY PLAN

Making a safety plan involves identifying the steps you can take to increase your safety and helps to prepare you and your children in advance for the possibility of further violence. You do not deserve to be abused. If you are currently living in an abusive relationship, are thinking about leaving, or have recently left, there are steps you can take to increase your safety. The following suggestions will help keep you safe!

If You are Currently With an Abusive Partner:

Your safety and the safety of your children is the most important thing. Women cannot always avoid violent incidents. In order to increase safety and prepare for further violence, here are some suggestions:

  • Know your partners triggers (i.e.) stress, pay days, alcohol
  • When you suspect there will be an argument, move to a space that is low risk
  • Try to stay out of places that do not have exits (i.e.) bathrooms, bedrooms
  • Try to stay out of places that have weapons such as knives or guns
  • Know your escape route from different areas of your home, in case you do need to leave
  • Teach your children the escape routes and practice using the escape routes from different areas
  • Have a safe meeting place outside the home in case you and your children become separated
  • Ensure your children know your address and telephone number and teach your children how to use the telephone and dial 911 in case of emergency
  • Have a code word for your children and your family so that they know to call for help when they hear that word
  • If you call someone (friend, family member) and you don’t want your partner to know, call another number that is not threatening to your partner immediately after, so your call cannot be traced
  • Be aware of your children’s ability to keep information confidential and be sure they do not overhear information that you do not want your partner to know

If You are Planning to Leave:

Making a safety plan involves identifying the steps you can take to increase your safety and helps to prepare you and your children in advance for the possibility of further violence.

If you are considering leaving an abusive relationship there are some actions that you may want to follow to increase your safety.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Call the police in an emergency or if you want to be assured of your safety
  • Call our crisis line (780) 875-0966 to get information and support
  • Make a Safety Plan.
  • Talk to a friend or family member.
  • Look for a safe place to stay (with family or at a shelter)
  • Prepare an Escape Plan.

SAFETY PLAN

  • Prepare and practice your escape plan.
  • Copy and collect all important documents and place them in a safe place (friend’s home or safety deposit box in a bank that your partner does not go).
    • Health Care and Social Insurance cards.
    • Credit and bank cards, cheque book.
    • Birth certificates (for you and the children).
    • Passport, immigration or citizenship papers.
    • Titles of property, lease, mortgage, and insurance papers.
    • Immunization card for the children.
    • Driver’s license and car registration.
    • Custody order, separation or divorce papers.
  • If possible, put aside an amount of money in cash to avoid being detected when you leave
  • Keep an extra set of car or house keys at a safe place (friend or family’s house)
  • Keep change or purchase a pre-paid calling card and use a pay phone to avoid being detected when you leave
  • Open a separate bank account in your name. Put as much as you can into it. You may be able to get your bank statement sent to your work or even friend’s address.
  • If you call someone (friend, family member) and you don’t want your partner to know, call another number that is not threatening to your partner immediately after, so your call cannot be traced
  • Be aware of your children’s ability to keep information confidential and be sure they do not overhear information that you do not want your partner to know

ESCAPE PLAN

  • Decide where you are going to go; somewhere safe and secure where you can decide what your next steps are.
  • Talk to your children. They need to know which neighbour to run to in an emergency. If they are old enough, teach them the phone number to call and what to say if they are trapped in the house.
  • If you decide to leave, take the children with you, if possible. It is not considered kidnapping; both parents have equal rights to their children, unless there is a court order. If you try to get them later, the police cannot help you to remove them from their other parent unless you have a valid court order.
  • Speak to people you trust. Let them know what is going on in case you need their help.
  • Call a shelter or transition house and talk to the staff. Even if you do not go to a shelter they can offer words of support and help you work out your plan.
  • Find a way to get to your emergency safe place. It can be a friend, neighbour, taxi, etc.
  • Find someone to care for your pets. The Lloydminster Interval Home partners with the SPCA to house your pets if you decide to leave your home
  • Find somewhere outside your home to keep your emergency bag and important documents.

Important Documents

  • Medical prescriptions.
  • Money, bank books, credit cards.
  • Health Care cards and Social Insurance cards.
  • Birth certificates (for you and the children).
  • Passport, immigration or citizenship papers.
  • Titles of property, lease, mortgage, and insurance papers.
  • Immunization card for the children.
  • Driver’s license and car registration.
  • Custody order, separation or divorce papers.

Emergency Bag

  • clothes for you and your children for a few days
  • medical prescriptions and medications, if required
  • money, bank books, credit cards
  • driver’s license and car registration and insurance
  • identification and important papers (marriage certificate, birth certificate, school records, social insurance numbers)
  • hospitalization numbers/cards for you and the children
  • First Nations status card, treaty numbers
  • immigration/citizenship papers, passports
  • medical records, police records, your journal or diary, and other evidence of violence
  • copies of your lease, mortgage or other deeds
  • your address/phone book
  • children’s favourite toys and books
  • your favourite possessions and photos (things that give you comfort)

DO NOT save this address as a bookmark on your browser (the software that allows you to access the internet). Write the address down and hide it where you know your partner will not find it. You may want to write this address in such a way that your partner will not know what it is. You can also memorize the address.

How to Delete Your Browser’s History

Click the your browser’s logo to learn how you can delete your browser history:

The internet is a great resource for finding information that can help you make decisions about your personal situation. However, it is important to realize that the record of your internet activities does not disappear when you close your browser. If you are concerned that the person abusing you may check up on your internet activities, there are a few steps you can take to help you cover your tracks, including deleting cookies and clearing your browser history (your cache).

If the person who is abusing you is good on a computer, it may not be safe for you to be visiting sites for abused women. Hide your internet activities and visit Interval Home from a safer place – the public library, school, an internet cafe or your workplace.

Cookies are a way for websites to track their visitors and their actions. Sometimes this means that the site will “remember” you when you visit again. For example, it may display your first name, which you entered on a previous visit. This is done by storing small bits of information on your computer. It is important to delete cookies when covering your tracks on the internet. Methods for deleting cookies vary depending on the type of computer you are using. To learn how to delete yours, read the instructions later in this section that match your computer system and browser.

Your computer’s cache (pronounced cash) will remember the most recent pages you have visited and store them for quick reloading. Emptying your cache is one way to delete the history of sites you have visited from your computer.

We have created more detailed instructions to help you hide your internet activities. If you need help to identify your web browser, click the “Help” menu at the top of your browser and click the “About” option.

Once you have determined your computer and browser information, open the instructions that match the kind of computer and browser you have to learn more. If you are unsure about these instructions or your partner is internet savvy, it may be safest to use the internet in a public space, such as the library, school or internet cafe.

Effects of Abuse

“Children see or hear some 40% to 80% of domestic violence incidents. Children who witness family violence suffer the same consequences as those who are directly abused. In other words, a child who witnessed spousal violence is experiencing a form of child abuse.” — RCMP, 2007

Common effects of abuse on women

  • Self Blame and Guilt
  • Shame
  • Low Self Esteem and Lack of Confidence
  • Anger
  • Fear
  • Isolation
  • Physical Symptoms: anxiety, depression, tension, insomnia, change in appetite, physical aches and pains such as headaches
  • Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Common effects of abuse on children

Every year in Canada, up to 360,000 children are exposed to Family Violence. It is normal for a child who witnesses intimate partner violence to manifest a multitude of symptoms. Outlined are some common effects of abuse that children from violent households may experience. Keep in mind that these signs and symptoms do not occur in isolation. One or two does not necessarily indicate a problem, but a combination of reactions may suggest that family violence is occurring in the home.

Difficulties Stemming from Abuse

  • general fearfulness, or constant fears of impending danger
  • difficulty dealing with fear, anger and sadness
  • feelings of guilt, helplessness, loneliness
  • anxiety about separation and loss
  • no connection to their own feelings
  • confusion or conflicting feelings toward parents
  • depression, suicidal ideation
  • fear of physical harm
  • fear of abandonment
  • nightmares/insomnia
  • difficulty eating
  • psychiatric disorders
  • aggression
  • Abused infants often exhibit a state of “frozen watchfulness,” that is, remaining passive and immobile, but intently observant of the environment. This appears to be a protective strategy in response to a fear of attack.
  • For abused and neglected children, the nature of their experiences adversely influences the development of their brains resulting in a devastating impact on neurodevelopment.
  • constant stomachaches, headaches, ulcers, rashes, diarrhea, or bed wetting
  • very high levels of stress
  • delays or regression in development
  • weight problems
  • speech disorders
  • frequent illness
  • poor overall health
  • poor hygiene
  • Chronic malnutrition of infants and toddlers results in growth retardation, brain damage, and potentially, mental retardation
  • Injury to the hypothalamus and pituitary glands in the brain can result in growth impairment and inadequate sexual development
  • Neglected infants and toddlers have poor muscle tone, poor motor control, exhibit delays in gross and fine motor development and coordination, fail to develop and perfect basic motor skills
  • inability to concentrate, behavioural and learning problems
  • withdrawal
  • low self esteem, lack of confidence
  • lack of trust
  • extreme shyness
  • clinging behaviour
  • disruptive classroom behaviour, poor school performance
  • troubled peer relationships
  • self destructive behaviours such as self mutilation or burning
  • early use of alcohol or drugs
  • truancy or running away behaviour
  • homelessness
  • criminal offending
  • oldest child becomes family caregiver